December 28, 2017

Getting a New Camera for Christmas?

New Camera, photographer, chesapeake family photographer

New Camera For Christmas?

Did your husband/wife/friend/partner do a really great job and get you a fancy new camera for Christmas? You certainly have a good one ;).

Christmas is the most popular time of the year for cameras.  I love to hear when someone gets a new camera for Christmas and how excited they are about it.  You are probably really excited to get some new pictures of your children and I don’t blame you. Your kids are only little for a short time. You should want to have some nice pictures of them growing!

I have a few tips to get you started with your new camera. I really hope that it inspires you to learn more about your new toy. To start, your camera probably already came with a kit lens, and hopefully a memory card, but most people have them lying around the house if yours didn’t. That’s all you need to get started! If you’re thinking about getting a new lens to go with your kit, I recommend you learn the basics with what you’ve got first. Realistically speaking, you can drop hundreds of dollars upgrading your gear. However, you won’t get those professional quality photos until you know how to use your gear.

1. Fully charge your battery before using it for the first time. Then go through all of your menu settings and properly set up your date and time/along with what file size you want your camera snapping pictures.

Yes, I know it sounds a bit simple minded, but it’s important to fully charge the battery before using it for the first time. Camera batteries are not necessarily expensive, but they aren’t too cheap either. I wouldn’t want you to diminish the life of your camera just because of a battery.

2. Learn the basics! I cannot stress this enough. Your DSLR has so much power and control behind it. There is a lot to take in and learn, so go at your own pace, but the best thing I ever did was learn to take my camera out of Automatic and learn how to use the different functions.

Most DSLR cameras have these basic settings. Automatic, Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, Manual, and Program Modes. Automatic is great for those point and shoot moments, but if you want to get better pictures, the first step would be to get out of Auto and into Aperture Priority to start.

3. Understand the “Exposure Triangle” The three factors that affect your camera’s exposure are ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speed. Adjusting one of these settings will require the other settings to be counter adjusted to maintain a proper exposure for your photos.

  • ISO is the cameras sensitivity to light. You want a low ISO if you are outside on a bright sunny day, and you want a higher ISO as the days grow long and you may need to keep a higher shutter speed to keep your subject from being blurry.
  • Aperture is amount of light the cameras lens lets through to the sensor. This is the first step to learning how to take great pictures. (In my most humble opinion, of course.). A lower aperture number with a close subject will give you more of a blurred background, while a higher number will put more of your frame in focus.
  • Shutter Speed is just that. It is how fast or slow your shutter opens and closes letting light into the sensor. A faster shutter speed will freeze motion and a slower shutter speed will open the cameras shutter for longer. So for example if you are taking pictures of kids, you will want a faster shutter speed. (As kids typically move around a lot) and if you are takin pictures of the stars, you will want an extremely slow shutter.
Understanding Exposure

Understanding your new camera settings

 

4.  Practice, Practice, Practice! I tell my children all the time.  It takes time and work to develop a talent.  Start out with something easy.  Take an object and start shooting with different apertures.  Adjust one stop and take a picture.  Adjust again, and again until you get the desired result.  Practicing with the different settings in real time  will give you a better understanding of how it all works together.

If you are looking to buy a lens to go along with your new camera, I suggest you invest in the ever so popular “nifty fifty”.  It is a relatively inexpensive lens that gives you a much lower aperture than you will get with a kit lens.  That in turn helps when looking to get a nice blurred background in your photos.

I also offer 1-2-1 as well as group training on how to use your new camera.  

Learn more about our photography education here! 

Hope you have a Merry Christmas! Happy Shooting!

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